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Optical halo?  

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(@volkanovun)
Main Sequence Star Customer
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 43
November 15, 2020 09:27  

Glow of primery mirror and shadow secondery are on the integrated frame. This reflection is not seen neighter taken images nor calibrated-normalized images but integreted. I'm surprised, I image Pleiades earlier hours at same nights  there is no reflection(s) on Pleiades.

My question is, how can I avoid this reflection if I can not, how can I remove it in APP?

 

Thanks for helps and advices.

image

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(@vincent-mod)
Universe Admin
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 3955
November 15, 2020 09:55  

Always difficult to say. I think it's not filter related (though you could check with your previous session) as usually those reflections are closer to stars. So it's likely an internal reflection in the scope, usually this requires a very careful study of your setup. As this is present in the data and not a gradient, it makes it harder to correct nicely, best is to get this solved on your setup.

You can try to use the light pollution correction to carefully place some boxes around it, but I'm not sure that will work very nicely.


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(@volkanovun)
Main Sequence Star Customer
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 43
November 15, 2020 10:11  

@vincent-mod Thanks for reply Vincent. I also suspect about scope setup and colimation first, but as I wrote above this reflection does not exist on Pleiades image which is taken earlier hours of same nights. Pleiades contains plenty bright stars as well. I expected to see same issue there. This makes me confused.


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(@vincent-mod)
Universe Admin
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 3955
November 15, 2020 10:22  

Yes that makes it a bit confusing, maybe you had some other light source in the neighborhood (even a very weak one) that came into view of the scope while it was pointing to this object?


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(@volkanovun)
Main Sequence Star Customer
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 43
November 15, 2020 10:31  

I'm not sure but I don't think so.

If you take a look my avatar I surrounded with street lights and there couldn't be much power lights than highways enlighting poles which are 300 meters away from me. My primary headache is light pollution but I image always under same conditions. This image is part of Jellyfish nebula, 40 degree above of horizon, no ground light source could affect but the star, I think.


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(@vincent-mod)
Universe Admin
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 3955
November 15, 2020 10:47  

Well, it could still be indirect light pollution (like reflecting of the insides of your scope, which is why some people with Newton scopes make it extra black). Having street-lights somewhat nearby, it could cause this. If it is indirect, there is something in your setup that reflects the light (probably). As I mention, it's very difficult to pinpoint if I'm not right there. 😉


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